Caveat Emptor

So we have come to the middle of another week. Hump day, Wednesday!

I looked up funny hump day jokes and found a slew. You can take your pick. Some of them are giggle-out-loud quality.

Anyway, I taught today and then went over to the sight loss support group. My low vision person was presenting the latest in low vision technology, the MoJo monocular.

Mojo monocular

I cannot give you much of a spiel on it. I have not done much more than glance through it and pass it on. Therefore, as usual, this is just me telling you what I read. No recommendation.

The MoJo is a magnifier that works both near and far point. The price for the handheld monocular itself is about $1500. Add the part that can turn it into a CCTV and you are looking at $3000 or so. The manufacturer, Enhanced Vision, advertises a large field of view and autofocus capabilities.

This may be a great addition to the list of low vision tools. May not be. The MoJo has only been on the market for two or three months. If you are interested and have the money, try it and give us a product review.

And continuing in the interested and have the money vein, I have started to see articles suggesting that, in spite of its celebrity endorsements in the UK, the Eyemax Mono may still have some bugs to work out. The Daily Mail reported the Macular Society is suggesting caution before you agree to undergo this expensive procedure. The cost being quoted is £15,000 which at present exchange rates is approximately $19, 480. Ouch. And if you are an American, remember the Eyemax Mono is not FDA approved and added to that cost would be a trip across the pond.

In short, it sounds promising, but remember caveat emptor. Use extreme caution before committing to any new procedure. Do your homework. Nothing is ever as good as it sounds at first blush.

The newest implant this side of the pond is a miniature telescope. This one is FDA approved so it should be both effective and safe. The manufacturer is VisionCare.  The surgery is Medicare eligible according to the article so we are not talking about huge out of pocket costs. That is a plus.

Now, once more, on the minus side, this is not a cure and will not halt the progression of the disease. All it is is magnification and a spreading of the image to intact parts of the retina. They have moved the magnification system from the outside in.

They also will only do the implant in one eye. That is because there is a ‘tunnel effect’ in the vision of the treated eye. The untreated eye is used for peripheral vision.

Another problem with the telescope is the need to train the brain. There is a period of several weeks during which the patient is learning to adapt to a new way of seeing.

Bottom line, things are progressing but not necessarily in the areas of treatment or cure. All three of these things mentioned magnify and move the image to intact retina. Close, but no cigar.

My personal preference is to find something medical that will stop the disease progression in it’s tracks. Barring that, magnification and relocating the image may bring you an undetermined period of better sight. You pay your money and you take your choice….just do it wisely. Continue reading “Caveat Emptor”

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Hindsight is 20/20

Good evening! How are you all?

Lin has noticed I seem to have written soooo many pages they are overwhelming and confusing some people. She feels this is particularly true for some of the newbies who probably feel like they have walked in on the (boring and confusing) middle of a movie. [Lin/Linda: to be clear, those are Sue’s words! ::grin::]

Understood. Some of you are back in the shock and doom phrase and I am talking about getting newspapers on your phones and other trivial matters. Who wants to hear about that sort of thing while your world is unraveling?

In the interest of pointing you towards something that might actually be helpful, Lin is republishing some earlier pages for your attention and discussion. And I – always helpful – am going to add to the confusion by writing another page!😘

This page will have a catchy title thanks to Lin, but right now I am going to call it “What I know now that I wish I had known a year and a half ago”.

First, you are not going everything black and dark blind.

It is not good but neither is it quite that bad. You are losing central vision. Things will not be good for anywhere from about 15 to 60 degrees of arc. Since normal visual fields are 170 or so degrees of arc, you have the potential to lose about a third of your vision. Not anything to cheer about but better than 100%.

You may not be doomed to progress to end stage AMD.

About 15% of patients become ‘wet’. About 15% progress to geographic atrophy. That means you – starting out with drusen and a diagnosis of early AMD – have a 85% chance of dodging the proverbial bullet for end stage AMD. You may very well not get as bad as I am and a year and a half after my second eye went to hell, I am still functional. [Lin/Linda: a person can have both wet AMD and geographic atrophy in the same eye.  I don’t what that does to the %, if anything.]

You did not cause this.

Yes, AMD is caused but it was not caused by anything you did or did not do. The causes are in your genes. This is a heritable disease. There are dozens if not hundreds of genes that are being investigated to try to figure out how AMD is created. It appears AMD may just be the result of a genetic ‘perfect storm’ and there is no one to blame.

There may come a time you are seeing things.

I saw some odd stuff when my brain was working overtime to assign meaning to the faulty images my eyes were sending it. You are not psychotic (I hope you are not psychotic). This is Charles Bonnet Syndrome. When your brain gives up trying to assign meaning to false signals you will stop seeing weird ‘stuff’. In the meantime, enjoy the fantasy.

Point number last: There is an amazing amount of hope for treatment and eventually a cure for AMD.

Research is going on everyday. New discoveries are announced with regularity. The medical community is hot on the trail of something that will arrest the progression and may even reverse this disease. All we have to do is hold on.

OK. Those were my biggie when I first lost my second eye. What are you worried about? Please share and we can discuss it. Continue reading “Hindsight is 20/20”

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Avoidable Blindness

I still get National Geographic even if I don’t read it cover to cover like I used to. I mean to get back to it – I really do; I love it! – but CCTV lights shining on glossy pages are a bit much. However, when my husband handed me a pile of old Nat Geos (National Geographics) and I saw the cover of September, 2016, I had to read at least one article. The title was The End of Blindness: Winning the Fight to See.

My first thought was “We have made the big time!” Cover of Nat Geo is absolutely the big time in my book. Then I thought “Everything they are saying about the incredible research and the discoveries made really is true.” Nat Geo for me is sort of like Walter Cronkite; if they say it, it is true.

The article has some scary statistics: 39 million people are not able to see, as in no functional vision at all. 246 million have reduced vision. That is rather a lot of people.

The article went on and talked about the research that is occurring. It talked about genetic engineering and stem cells. They also mentioned two different types of ‘bionic eyes’.

In addition, it mentioned that Sanford Greenberg has pledged $3 million in gold to the person who contributes the most to ending blindness by his end date, 2020, of course! (Better get busy on your cure projects!) The Audacious Goal Initiative continues going strong, handing out money to worthy research projects. People are putting their money where their mouths are and getting behind this campaign.

Eliminate all blindness by 2020? Great goal, but probably not attainable. Curing avoidable blindness might be possible. Avoidable blindness?

AMD is my condition and my passion. I am doing well but I would do a heck of a lot better if someone found a cure for this stuff. Problem is, according to Nat Geo, AMD is a piddly 1% of the total picture! It is important to you and me but it barely makes a blip on the world radar.

If our condition is so insignificant in the big picture, what is significant? Refraction errors. That is 43% of the problem. Nearly half of the vision problems of the human race could be cured by giving people glasses.

Guess that means we all get to dig in drawers and find our old spectacles. Call your local Lions Club to find the nearest collection box. Or better yet, Walmart Optical is supposed to collect them. Drop them off the next time you go shopping. Better they are helping someone to see than sitting in a drawer for the next decade or two.

And if you really want to get rid of more sight problems, try cataracts at 33%. In the developing world people with cataracts get to go blind. No one to do the operations is part of the problem. Nat Geo says Niger has 18 million people and 7 ophthalmologists! The other problem is funding. Subsistence farming does not allow one to pay for medical specialists.

One last plug and I am out of here. Nat Geo mentions a worthy charity: SEE International. Stands for Surgical Eye Expeditions. They provide cataract surgeries free of charge.

Done here. Bed time! Night! Continue reading “Avoidable Blindness”

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I Have Macular Degeneration…Now What?

If you aren’t familiar with how to move around on our website pages, click here

Where can I quickly find information about AMD?

One of the best resources available is from the Prevent Blindness organization’s website called Guide Me.  You answer a few questions and you will get a personalized guide with important aspects of AMD based on your answers.  Click here to go to Guide Me.

What other websites are helpful?

Here are some of our favorites:

  • Click here for a video that covers important information about AMD
  • Click here for a description of dry vs. wet AMD (we are not recommending any products in this article)
  • Click here for an article about depression after diagnosis (which is common)
  • Click here for some answers to common questions about depression after diagnosis
  • Click here for an article about how vision rehabilitation helps prevent long-term depression
  • Click here for a very comprehensive page about wet AMD
  • Click here for a very comprehensive page about dry AMD
  • Click here for an article about how fast AMD progresses
  • Click here for 10 questions to ask your doctor
  • Click here to find a support group
  • Click here to find out should I take the AREDS or AREDS2 supplements?
  • Click here read about the role of nutrition in AMD
  • Click here for eye healthy foods including a Healthy Vision Grocery List
  • Click here for a January 2017 scientific review article“Nutritional and Lifestyle Interventions for Age-Related Macular Degeneration: A Review”
  • Click here to find out what vision changes/symptoms to look for
  • Click here to find out about the people who can help you (what are the differences between the types of eye doctors, do I need to see a specialist, etc)
  • Click here for tips on how to make the most of the vision you have
  • Click here for a FAQ (Frequently Asked Questions) that answers a long list of questions such as ‘will resting help my eyes?’, ‘Can I see for myself if my retina or macula shows any signs of damage before I have symptoms?’, ‘why don’t new eye glasses help?’, ‘what is meant by degeneration?’, ‘is a macular hole the same as macular degeneration’, ‘I have had dry MD for years. Does this mean I’m going to get wet MD too?’, ‘No one else in my family has MD. Why did I get it?’, ‘can drusen be treated?’, ‘I have changes on the Amsler Grid, does this mean I have MD’, ‘I have Wet MD but my Doctor says there is nothing he can do or no treatment available. Why is this?’

Where can I do more research?

Of course you can do searches on the Internet – there is a LOT of information there.  We have done a lot of research and here’s how you can find it.

  • through Sue’s Journal Pages. Sue became visually impaired early in 2016.  She is a psychologist trained in Dialectic Behavior Therapy (DBT), a cognitive behavioral therapy, and she writes about how she is using it to help her cope with this vision loss.
  • on our Resource page where there are links to many sources of information such as what is AMD, what is Stargardt’s Disease, organizations and websites with useful information, support groups, videos, books & reading materials, where to find vision services, where to find financial help especially for injections, personal stories, the science stuff, clinical trials & research (and how you can become part of one,  online newsletters, symptoms, possible causes/contributing factors, treatments, coping, how to take care of yourself…and more!
  • and in the posts in News/Highlights blog

There are more ways to get information from our website

Search or select CategoryYou can actually do research ON OUR WEBSITE!  You can find things such as in which of Sue’s journal pages does she talk about depression, where can I get more information about sunglasses or vitamins, etc.  If you are using a computer, for example a laptop, you may have seen the search box plus words under Categories and words under Tags/Keywords on the right side of each page. If you use a tablet or smartphone & the screen isn’t wide enough, unfortunately you have to go all the way down to the end of each page to see these sections.

Do you want to know in which pages Sue talks about depression? You can type the word depression (you can also type multiple words) in the search box or select the word depression under Tags/Keywords and you’ll get all of her pages where she talks about it plus you will get any of the News/Highlights posts as well as any matches in the Resources/Links or News/Highlights pages, too. If you want to find everything on our site about sunglasses, you could type the word into the search box or look for the word under Tags/Keywords and select it.

Tags/KeywordsIf you want a broader range of pages & posts such as ‘Tips for living with low vision’, you’ll see that under Categories.

 

 

 

 

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I’ve set up this page so that when you click on a link (words that are underlined & in blue or green), a NEW tab will open in your browser and this page STAYS WHERE IT IS.  When you are done with the new page you opened, just close it.  You do NOT need to use the back option.  If you click on a link and the new page replaces this one, I’VE MADE A MISTAKE so please let me know by sending me an email at light2sight5153@gmail.com.  Let me know exactly which link or links do not open a new tab or window.

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Linda & her dog Chase
Linda & her dog Chase

To find about more about me, about Sue, about our project, go to the menu at the top of the page for sections about each of those.

 

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I Have Macular Degeneration…Now What?
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News: Summary of AMD Research & Developments for past 12 months – June 2016

Here’s an excellent summary of the research and developments in the field of AMD.  It’s done by Dan Roberts of mdsupport.org which is a site I highly recommend for both information and support.

Click here for the audio with slides presentation. You don’t have to be able to see the slides, the audio is very clear.

Click here for a transcript of the presentation.

 

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News: Summary of AMD Research & Developments for past 12 months – June 2016
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News: Surgery for Wet AMD

 April 2016

We can’t transplant the retina (yet) but researchers in Italy have had success replacing damaged tissue below the retina in the choroid layer with tissue from the patient because it has less chance of being rejected. Tissue taken from the patient and moved to the choroid is called autologous choroidal transplantation.

Click here to review ‘the science stuff’ regarding how the eye is structured.

Here are 2 articles about the procedure.

Click here for a more technically-oriented article in Ocular Surgery News.

Click here for an easier to read version in WebRN.

 

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Link: How could virtual reality help people with AMD?

Great article!

 

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Link: How could virtual reality help people with AMD?
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