Diffy Cults

Just getting a quick page or two written before I am off. That is off as in off on vacation not as in “she is a little bit off.” That happened quite a while ago.?

Still hoping to get my loaner CCTV before we leave but I doubt it will happened. A friend of my husband’s is watching the house. He promised to take delivery and pack up my machine to send for repairs.

I am still hoping against logic that this will all be settled by the time we get back. Cockeyed optimist; so shoot me.

Of course, I have found several interesting web articles now I don’t have a lot of time to go over them and no CCTV. Since I don’t have my machine to put them on to read, I put one on NaturalReader. Let the iPad read to me. [Lin/Linda: to read all about NaturalReader, go to Sue’s page Let Me Read to You.]

Some of the pronunciations are a bit ‘off’ as well. D.O., doctor of optometry, comes out as ‘odd’. I guess she calls them as she sees ’em!? She? It is a female voice on my machine. Not sure if I could change it if I wanted. Never tried.

Found something called Practical Guidelines for Treatment of AMD. The pamphlet says with all of the rapid advances in potential treatments for AMD it makes it “diffy cult” for practitioners to know what will be “Benny Fish All” to their patients.? Gotta watch those “diffy cults”. Not to mention that Benny Fish All. OK, OK, so I am easily entertained.

The article suggests doctors are not proactive enough in the early stages of the disease. It suggested something like 78% of AMD patients have substantial, irreversible vision loss already at the time of the first treatment. This includes 37% who have become legally blind by the first treatment. Yikes! It goes on to state not all drusen are a result of AMD and doctors may hesitate to make the diagnosis on the criteria of drusen alone. There is also the patient variable involved. Will the patient believe she is losing her sight and do something if there is no acuity loss? Will she freak? Stay tuned….

The article suggests using dark adaptation problems to emphasize there is a real problem even when acuity seems just fine. It quotes statistics dark adaptation is an excellent predictor of age-related macular degeneration and is, indeed, 90% accurate!

In other words, if you know someone who has a lot of problems with dark adaptation, suggest they be checked for AMD. There is evidence problems with dark adaptation can be detected up to three years before the disease can be detected through clinical measures.

Later….There is a lot more in that article, but I have to sign off here. Too much over 500 words and I turn into a pumpkin. Watch out for those “Diffy Cults” and if you run into “Benny Fish All” say hello for me. After all, he is the kind sort. Me, I’m going to crank up my loaner CCTV. It came today!

Written October 27th, 2017 Continue reading “Diffy Cults”

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Secret Passages in the Eyeball

Back again. Chatty sort, ain’t I? ? I really thought I was done for awhile but I keep finding things; ya know? If (should I even use the word ‘if’?) you are tired of hearing me chatter, please write a page! We are anxious for more offerings. [Lin/Linda: if you haven’t read the pages by our guest authors, click here to see what we are talking about.]

Back to the topic at hand (I am not only chatty, but I go off on tangents, a lot of tangents??☝ ) the most recent thing to land in my inbox is a Medscape article Lin sent me. We are back to the stem cell research!

This article uses a lot of the concepts and vocabulary we have introduced over the months. I will review as we go along – I don’t remember it all myself! – and Lin might help us out with some links to previous pages. Pretty please and thank you.  [I think the best place to learn about stem cells is a short YouTube video.   Also, check out Sue’s early page Research.]

I am signed up for a Janssen Pharmaceutical study with stem cells. Guess who did this study? Do you ever feel LEFT OUT? Once again, I would love to know how to get on the A list for these things. Not sure all the places the study happened, though. One place was Kentucky. Maybe I was a ‘geographic undesirable’? I will have to do a little research after hip hop. (Some things do take precedence!?)

OK. Here we go. I looked up PRELUDE, etc and got routed to Clinical trials.gov. It is only going into phase 2 but the good news is they are recruiting. The better news is they are recruiting at Mid Atlantic Retina, Regillo’s place. Now I am getting stoked. “Watson!…The game is afoot!”

Shoot off an email later and get ready to accost Regillo when I see him in December. One other person who is only starting to realize the depths of my tenacity! (Cue Vincent Price laughter!)

OK. Enough nonsense….for now?. From the looks of things, PRELUDE was a study checking, for at least one thing, the feasibility of a delivery system. If you recall, we talked about ways of delivering stem cells to the back of the eye where they belong before. No just shooting them into the vitreous fluid where they roll around like loose cannon balls and end up who knows where. No, no, no! They must be placed. The way they are placed is to thread them through the subretinal space.

Now I am thinking the suprachoroidal space and the subretinal space are the same thing but I really don’t know. [The title of the article I linked to above is “Subretinal Delivery of Cells via the Suprachoroidal Space: Janssen Trial”.] How many ‘secret passages’ can an eyeball have? Be that as it may, the whole idea is to snake through this space (or spaces?) and get to the back of the eyeball without violating the integrity of the vitreous and opening it to infection.

The progress of the implanted cells in this study was checked with microperimetry. This appears to be an up and coming imagining technique we also talked about. It is a technique that tests which parts of the retina are working and how well they are actually working.

Which brings me to my word limit and bedtime. I have been to hip hop and back and need to take a bath and get ready for bed.

I did find what I think is the original journal article for this as well as the clinicaltrials.gov listing. I will follow up….tomorrow.

written October 16th, 2017 Continue reading “Secret Passages in the Eyeball”

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Keep an Eye on Your Eyes

I gave up trying to be perfect a long time ago. Too much like work. That is the reason I get it when people let things lapse. You meant to call the doctor about the vision change you think you are seeing but another day is gone and you never got to it.

Or how about this one? You don’t want to bother such a busy guy (or gal) with a silly, little worry. Then there is the forever popular, if I don’t think about it, it will go away!

Yep, dozens of ‘good’ reasons for not monitoring your vision and keeping your doctor in the proverbial loop. My reason for seldom if ever monitoring? (Come on! At least I own it.) My macula is so far gone I am back on biannual visits. I have it on good authority I will most likely not progress to wet AMD. Relief, yes, but I still sort of wish there was enough left I had to worry.

But that is me. There are plenty of you who are still at risk for developing wet AMD. There are also plenty of you who wish they had responded to early warnings before they lost vision. Since that second group are living testimonies to the fact things happen when we are not paying attention, how do we pay better attention to the progression of our disease?

For years the only game in town has been the Amsler Grid. This being the age of technology it is certainly understandable there are suddenly all sorts of machines and apps that not only do the job of monitoring but also narc on you and call your doctor! (Big Brother is even watching your eyes!)

I did a page on myVisionTrack a while ago. I downloaded it but could not play with it because it needed a script from my doctor. It was also for pay. So far this year we have replaced the washer and the dishwasher, rehabbed the pool and had Beastie Baby to the puppy doctor a few times; forgive me if I don’t invest in some of these things. If you use the service, please comment.

The new one I just discovered is ForeseeHome. This is manufactured by Notal Vision, an Israeli company. The company provides an electronic device that is connected to a telecommunication system. Everyday the patient takes three or four minutes to test her vision. If there is a significant change both the patient and her doctor are notified of the need for an immediate appointment.

ForeseeHome is again by prescription only. The frequently asked questions on the website suggest the unit and service are Medicare covered if you meet the eligibility. Apparently you have to be “dry AMD at high risk of progressing to wet AMD”. Am I sure what that means exactly? What I think it means is someone may have to jump through hoops to get Medicare to actually pay for it, but you can get one with a good argument.

If your doctor wants you to monitor much more closely than you are, one of the new electronic systems may be for you. Spend three or four minutes once a day. Eliminate the guesswork. Eliminate feeling guilty for ‘bothering’ the doctor. Help save your sight.

Written August 9th, 2017

Continue reading “Keep an Eye on Your Eyes”

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Timeline Part 1: Advances in Treatment & Care for People with Macular Degeneration

It’s Lin/Linda.  I created this page to go with Sue’s page Not Your Parents’ AMD.  Like some of you, I had a loved one with AMD.  It was my father who was diagnosed with AMD in 2005 at the age of 82.  At the time, I was living 700 miles away and I did not know much about the disease or at what stage he was diagnosed.  He progressed to geographic atrophy (GA), that much I knew.  He was the sole caregiver for my mother who had Alzheimer’s Disease.  He continued to drive (not safely), take care of her and the house.  He was never referred to vision rehabilitation or offered any help other than being told to use handheld magnifiers.

I wondered how things have changed since then which led me to do this timeline review.  Not only have there been advances in the medical end of the field but also in the technology that is allowing people to remain independent for as long as possible.  That is if a person learns how to use the various devices and apps available.

I’ve based the categories of time on an article Age-Related Macular Degeneration
1969 –2004: A 35-Year Personal Perspective by Stuart L. Fine, MD published in 2005.  He says “In 1969, patients with AMD constituted a small part of a typical ophthalmic practice. From 1969 to 2004, the prevalence of AMD has increased, and the methods of evaluation and treatment have changed dramatically.”

I know I have missed many events that have been critical to the history of the treatment & care of AMD.  There is SO much information out there and I’ve tried to use the most significant dates I could find.  Have a suggestion of what to include? Did I get a date wrong? Let me know in a comment or send me an email at light2sight5153@gmail.com.

1st Era: 1969–1979
  • Emergence of fluorescein fundus photography: test used in diagnosis of retinal diseases
  • Development of ‘hot’ (high power) laser photocoagulation, first treatment for wet AMD
  • Relationship of drusen to age-related macular degeneration
  • Other developments:
    • 1976-1977 first personal computers affordable for home use
    • more low vision aids:
      • 1960s large print books became available
      • 1976 large print calculators became available
      • 1969-1970 CCTV (closed caption TV) for reading aid
2nd Era: 1980–1994
  • Clinical trials to evaluate new treatments, especially laser photocoagulation (1979-1994)
  • Development of risk factor data from large and small epidemiologic studies (epidemology is looking for patterns & causes)
  • mid-1980s term ‘senile macular degeneration’ becomes ‘age-related macular degeneration’
  • Other developments:
    • 1982 Vitreous Society was founded; 1983 first meeting attended by 44 retinal specialists
    • 1991 OCT (Optical Coherence Tomography) test used in diagnosis of retinal diseases
    • mid 1980s name changed from ‘senile macular degeneration’ to ‘age-related macular degeneration’
    • 1992 Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA)
    • 1983 first cell phones
    • 1991 World Wide Web for ‘surfing’ the Internet with easy-to-use browsers
    • low vision aids:
      • MaxiAids catalog of aids for orders from people with low vision & other impairments
    • technology/low vision aids:
      • 1982 DragonSystems founded Dragon NaturallySpeaking, speech to text
      • 1988 ZoomText was released which is software to magnify text on a computer screen
3rd Era: 1995–2003
  • Evaluation of radiation therapy for neovascular AMD, not proven to be effective
  • Assessment of pharmacologic interventions for neovascular AMD; Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) “cold” (low power laser) with Visudyne (first drug treatment;  2001)
  • Prevention trials: results AREDS released 2001
  • Other developments:
    • 1995 Amazon sells books online (1998 expands beyond just books; e-books 2000)
    • 1996 Google released
    • 1998 first e-book reader The Rocket
    • 2000 GPS available for civilians; 2001 personal navigation systems available like Garmin and TomTom
    • 2000 Microsoft & Amazon sell e-books
4th Era: 2004 – 2017
  • Completion of ongoing trials for neovascular AMD: FDA approval: Macugen 2004; Avastin 2004; Lucentis 2006; Eylea 2011
  • Earlier identification of eyes at risk: regular use of OCT (Optical Coherence Tomography) and other diagnostic tests
  • Prevention trials: results AREDS2 released 2013
  • Increased number of retinal specialists: eg, American Association of Retinal Specialists (ASRS), formerly Vitreous Society (see 1982 above), has 2700 members representing 60 countries.
  • Other developments:
    • 2011 First baby boomers turn 65
    • 2004 Facebook
    • 2013 first ‘bionic eye’ retinal implant, Argus II approved by FDA
    • technology:
      • 2007 Amazon Kindle e-reader; iPhone & Apple IOS
      • 2008 Android 1.0 & Android phone
      • 2010 Apple iPad
    • technology/low vision aids:
      • 2005 Apple VoiceOver for Mac users
      • 2009 VoiceOver added to iPhone IOS
      • 2010 FDA approved implantable telescope
      • smart glasses/wearable technology
      • 2014 KNFB Reader app for Apple & Android; 2017 for Windows 10
    • ongoing research areas:

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Not Created Equal

We heard from a reader who has vitelliform macular dystrophy. I had never heard of it. Therefore you can image my surprise when I picked up an article I had downloaded last week and – guess what! – the article talked about vitelliform dystrophy! Sometimes the synchronicity in the Universe is scary.

Anyway, it appears the Universe has declared we are to learn about vitelliform dystrophy. Here we go!

I have discovered all macular diseases are not created equal. There are dozens of them and researchers are discovering more on a regular basis.

Vitelliform dystrophy may look like age-related macular degeneration and act like macular degeneration but it is not macular degeneration. (Don’t worry. We are not throwing you out of the group!)

Vitelliform dystrophy is a pattern dystrophy. They are so called because the damage tends to ‘draw’ things on the retina. For example, one manifestation of the disease looks like a butterfly (photo to the right is a fundus photograph of butterfly pattern).

Vitelliform 2 is called Best disease. This is not because it is the best disease to have nor is it because Dr. Best hijacked the disease and named it for himself. It is because the disease comes as a result of a mutation on the BEST1 gene. (Apparently that means we all have BEST genes and there are at least two of them. How about that.)

Best disease is a pattern dystrophy because – all together now! – it makes a PATTERN on your retina. The pattern is a sunny-side-up egg. The yolk is centered on the fovea.

One of the nice things about Best disease is you may never know you have it.  According to the Hereditary Ocular Disease site 7 to 9 percent of those with Best disease are asymptomatic. Others may experience vision loss but recover most of their function. A much smaller percentage may proceed to neovascularization and serious loss. Of course, the older we get the better chance we have of having some really serious problems. And by the way, children can have this one.

That is because, once again, it is genetic. Best disease is an autosomal dominant condition. That means it is on a body-forming chromosome – not the chromosome that has the x or the y and makes you a boy or a girl.  It is also dominant and can express itself whether or not its partner gene wants it to. You only need one of these babies to be in trouble.

Of course there are all sorts of things that may or will affect whether or not this gene does actually express. However, this is not a place to discuss epigenetics. Nor am I the one to explain THAT baby! Suffice it to say, you should warn everyone you are related to by blood that it has expressed in the family and they need to have regular eye exams.

Like AMD there is absolutely no treatment and no cure. (I get so tired of typing that). If you have Best disease and progress to CNV you may profit from shots.

And that, my dears, is that. Continue reading “Not Created Equal”

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Good Guy Force

We could be a force. Really! According to ScienceDaily (4/27/17) we are up to an estimated 14 million AMD sufferers in the States alone. That is one big number of visually impaired older folks!

We already know knowledge is power. Numbers are power, too. It is hard to ignore that many people. That is slightly more than the populations of Buenos Aires or Istanbul. Wow.

So now that we realize we have so much power, we need to decide if we want to use it for good or evil. Silly question! We all know we are the Good Guys!

Good guys go out and rescue people; right? Well, it turns out there are a heck of a lot of people who need to be rescued!

What am I talking about? David Neely at the University of Alabama re-examined 644 people who had been given clean bills of macular health based on routine eye exams. Double that to get the number of eyeballs, 1288.

Neely found 320 eyes had AMD! That is 25%! There was not a whisper in medical records about any of these eyes having drusen. Undiagnosed AMD was associated with older patients, male gender and less than a high school education.

Maybe there is no treatment for those eyes now, but what about in five or ten years? By then such lapses in diagnosis may mean the difference between an easy fix and serious problems.

Hot Topics Small Talk (volume 2, number 5) also picked up on Neely’s work and make a nice, little summary sheet for us. This summary noted it is harder to visualize the retina during routine exams in older adults. Maybe ‘routine’ should become a bit more rigorous? The pathology was observed using fundus photography.

Other findings cited by Hot Topics? The presence of cataracts did not contribute to misdiagnosis. Also, it did not matter if the initial exam was done by an ophthalmologist or an optometrist.

Essentially, this research suggests we could be over 17 million strong (and I mean that word, strong) if these early cases were not being overlooked. Like I said, perhaps not essential now but possibly crucial in the future.

So, your mission, should you choose to accept it, is to encourage everyone, but especially older folks, to have fundoscopic examinations of their eyes. As usual, should any of your AMD Good Guy force be caught doing this, we will be very proud of you. This page will self-destructive in ten, nine, eight…… Continue reading “Good Guy Force”

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Shimmering

Albert Einstein once said “the more I learn, the more I realize what I don’t know.” Apparently I am in good company, because I feel the same way.

With no immediate crises in my life and no immediate reason to freak out – and even with geographic atrophy and permanent retina damage, this state of affairs is possible! – I have been trying to get caught up with some research. I keep running into things I have no knowledge or understanding of.

Lin suggested that after over a year we should know SOMETHING about these things. We don’t. For example, I am still clueless about what I can expect concerning the progression of density of my ‘blind spots’.

And speaking of disease progression, (was that a smooth segue or was that a smooth segue??), I do have a couple of things to say about disease progression from that last article I read. Remember the one on GA?

The article opined all the new interest and hoopla about dry AMD came from the success with treating wet. However it wasn’t why I would think. You know, we have scaled that mountain and are looking for new summits sort of thing? Nope, the reason was they discovered that even after severely limiting the development of neovascularization in eyes, the eyes just kept right on progressing with dry AMD! Sorry, darlings.? It seems a former wet AMD eye becomes a dry AMD eye.

And dry AMD – to my great chagrin – progresses. How much? I assume it can take the entire macula but I have not seen that definitely stated anywhere. I have seen it stated that it generally stops with the macula. Maybe not such a ‘small’ favor. Could be a lot worse.

The last thing I learned from that article is how best to document disease progression. That is with something called cSLO FAF. Isn’t that informative? Exciting even!

OK, OK, just ‘funning’ with you. I looked it up. Fundus autofluorescence is diagnostic imagery. It detects fluorophores in the retina. Fluorophores being chemicals that re-emit lights shone at them. Research quoted by Wu in Use of Fundus Autofluorescence in AMD said risk of wet AMD can be predicted by a patchy reflection pattern and lots of ‘shimmer’ (my word) at the edge of a patch of geographic atrophy is predictive of cell death and growth of the GA. The more ‘shimmer’ the worse the trouble you are in. [Lin/Linda: We hadn’t had a music reference for some time.  When I hear the word ‘shimmer’, I think of John Lennon’s song “Julia” which uses the word ‘shimmering’, hence this page’s title. ::smile::]

So if anyone throws a bunch of letters ending with FAF at you and says you are going to have that, it may be they are checking for disease progression. I cannot remember ever having one, but it is noninvasive so no biggie. Should not hurt. Just more pretty pictures. Hopefully they will find something good.

Pretty much it for now. Will probably write some more nonsense between now and then, but Wednesday I am going to another support group meeting. They are demonstrating an electronic monocular called a Mojo and I want to see it. Will let you know!

Chat with you later!

 

written May 6th, 2o17 Continue reading “Shimmering”

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