Managing Medications

Never really thought about it in quite this way, but VisionAware has a series of ‘getting started as a visually impaired person’ posts. Sort of like a starter kit for a hobby. Instead of scrapbooking or constructing terrariums, we get visual impairment. “Oh, yes, did I tell you? I’m taking up visual impairment. This book says that in just six easy lessons ($19.99 each) I can have the start of a very promising visually impaired person. And the book says I can do this at home in my spare time!”

Uh, yeah. Really did not need another hobby…especially THIS one.

That is not to say, however, that a ‘how to’ series for vision loss newbies is not a fine idea. It is such a fine idea I am going to borrow shamelessly from them in writing this, and perhaps another page.

The page I am borrowing from is entitled Products and Devices to Help You Identify Your Medications. In that article they cover all sorts of clever ideas for trying to make sure we don’t poison ourselves. I vote for that!

Some of the suggestions in their article are as simple and low tech as keeping a black tray in the bathroom so you can have contrast to see your pills. Others are more high tech. The one I am going to focus on is a high tech option: audio description.

The VisionAware article mentions several different options for audio description devices to use with your medications. There is one manufactured by AccessaMed and there is another one called Talking Rx. But the one I want to talk about is ScripTalk. Why? Can’t write about everything in 500 words.

According to a disabilities lawyer (lflegal.com), many pharmacies are now offering talking labels and label readers for medication bottles. The lawyer’s website gives kudos to a number of chains. (We will ignore the thinly veiled attempt to drum up litigation business.)

I will get back to offering some chain names in a minute but first let’s talk about how this works. Apparently your pharmacist reads the label information into a device that digitizes the information and puts it on a little label that he attaches to the bottle. When you get it home, you have a reader that will allow you to hear what the pharmacist said.

Now, ScripTalk is offered through CVS, HEB, Walmart and Humana. It is a free service to satisfy the requirements of ADA. Of those four corporations, however, the article lists only the customer service numbers for CVS and WalMart. Got a pen? The CVS number is 800-746-7287. The Walmart mail-order pharmacy number is 1-888-237-3403.

Just because you are not in the States and subject to the ADA, does not mean you cannot get medicine bottle labels that talk to you. I have it on pretty good authority (the Vancouver Sun online from 10/07/2016) Shoppers Drug Mart was sued under Canadian accessibility laws and now offers ScripTalk, and free use of a ScripTalk reader.

In the United Kingdom Boots started offering talking medicine labels in 2006. (My, but the Colonies are Johnny-come-latelies on this!) Not exactly sure what is happening on this issue in Australia. Most of what I found there was about a general relabeling of all pharmaceuticals. Anyone know?

Call your pharmacy and see what they offer in the way of audio description labels and readers for your medications. If they have nothing it might be good to remind them this is an accessibility issue. Nothing then? I heard of this disability rights attorney….😱

Have a great evening. Don’t accidental poison yourself.

Written August 11th, 2017

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