Progress Daily

I really cannot win with this transportation business. Now they are on a string of late pick-ups and I am waltzing in 45 minutes after everyone else. Grrrrrrrrrr!

Oh well, can’t fix it. Time to start a page…..and as soon as I am into it, they will show up. Same concept as going to the bathroom in the restaurant to ‘make’ your meal arrive faster.  Aha! Recognition! You have done that, too!

PRELUDE, the study, is NCT02659098. I checked and this is the same study I put my name in for last year. I just shot off a message to my research contact and asked her to make sure my ‘registration’ is still good. I am nothing if I am not persistent. Sad to say it is one of my better traits (oh no!)

There are actually two, main measurable outcomes they are interested in. There are the efficacy of the delivery system and best corrected acuity after administration of the stem cells. In the clinicaltrials.gov post they refer to the stem cells as CNTO 2476. In other literature they named the stem cells Palucorcel.  I guess it is better than George (with apologies to the royal family. I have never liked the name George, although the little guy is a cutie!) Of course, Palucorcel does not exactly fall trippingly off the tongue.

Anyway, according to a one page write-up by Jessica Lynch, previous attempts to circumvent the vitreous and go in subretinally caused too many problems. They are, as I had been led to believe previously, trying to go around to the macula using the suprachoroidal space as their passage. (Anyone ever see Fantastic Voyage? I keep thinking how incredible it would be to jump in my microscopic submarine and motor through the suprachoroidal space!) After preclinical trials with mini pigs were successful, they launched into prime time with a phase 1 trial with people. As I said, they are now recruiting for phase 2. [Sue wrote about subretinal and suprachoroidal are in the previous page: Secret Passages in the Eyeball

Looking at the additional data on clinical trials.gov I discovered there are secondary outcomes for the study. They will be looking at quality of life and reading speed as well as whether the stem cell transplants slow or even stop the growth of the geographic atrophy. They are also looking at how many people convert to wet AMD. It sounds as if this study would be a long term commitment for the ‘lab rats’ chosen.

Going back to the Medscape article about phase 1, I discovered they had pretty good success threading through the space and the transplanted cells grew and started to function.

Cell placement was important. They used the microperimetry to figure out what retinal areas the subjects were using for eccentric viewing. Too close and that could be messed up. Cell placement other places was better.

Results? The subjects had some improvement in vision. That was SOME. Before you get too excited, remember this is RPE replacement. RPEs do not see. They support your photoreceptors. Some of the photoreceptors that are at death’s door may come back but the dead ones stay dead.

I did run off the journal write-up on phase 1 and I promise to tackle it and see if there were any other cool findings. Later. Right now I have laundry to sort. Maybe listen to an NCIS episode. It is now playing all the way through on my tablet!  What can I say? It really is the little things.

Progress daily, guys. Progress daily. We will get there.

written October 17th, 2017

Next: coming soon!

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