Rick’s Story: Part 1

Our guest author is Rick, a friend of Sue’s friend.

I was diagnosed with macular pucker in January of 2016 at my annual eye exam.  I had noticed blurring in my right eye but it still shocked me. I read the NEI (National Eye Institute) write-up about macular pucker and other website reports.  I was sent to a retina specialist outside the area in April.  He advised surgery but I wanted to have it checked in three months.  We did that in July and it had gotten a bit worse though not much.  He sent me to another specialist even farther outside the area who confirmed the diagnosis and recommended surgery. This specialist had excellent references but it would be hard to follow-up with him.

By this time my right eye was pretty bad. My left eye was doing all the work regarding driving and reading.

I decided to go back to my family doctor because if we used doctors outside of the area, it would be logistically difficult for my wife to pick me up.   Sure enough the local hospital had a retinal specialist.

Click here for a video that explains what a macular pucker is.

We met in mid August and one week or so later he performed the delicate surgery.  I was impressed by the local specialist’s calm demeanor and knowledge.  He confirmed everything that specialists in the more cosmopolitan areas had said.  On Thursday August 25th I went down mid morning to an off-campus facility for the hospital. All of the nurses and receptionists were super friendly and supportive. Still, I was overwhelmed by anxiety.

The first hour was numbing the eye with ointment and installing an IV with medication to calm me down.   “You will be aware but won’t care” was the mantra of the helpers. A second doctor came in and checked me regarding the anesthetic. There was concern because I was battling sniffles from a cold.

The retinal specialist came out and initialed above the right eye.  I was wheeled in and the doctor and his assistants operated on my eye.  I could hear them talk but no pain.  They were pumping some drugs into me all the while.  The surgery lasted about 40 minutes. They brought me back out and bandaged up the right eye.

I stopped by the next day for an exam by the specialist.  I am to put two different drops in the eye four times a day and keep the eye covered at night. I understand that the specialist did 4 macular surgeries similar to mine on Thursday.

I don’t see a lot better in the right eye but see about the same. The retinal specialist said that it would take a month to improve. A little discomfort but no major pain.   God Bless the retinal specialist and our local hospital!

Next: Rick’s Story: Part 2

Home

Ratings

  • Rate this
  • Summary
Current Average Ratings
Overall quality
Avg: 5.00/5
Applies to topic
Avg: 4.00/5
Helpful to me
Avg: 5.00/5
Rick’s Story: Part 1
Total Avg Rating: 4.65 out of 5 with based on 1 rating(s)
Overall quality
Applies to topic
Helpful to me

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.