Research: Dry & Wet AMD

Hello! I am going to get to the article Lin found on BrightFocus Foundation’s website about ‘lamp stuff’ aka lampalizumab but first I wanted to quickly mention a Google Talk by Isaac Lidsky. The title is Eyes Wide Open.

Lidsky began losing his sight to retinitis pigmentosa when he was 13 years of age. Although he has been totally blind for many years, Isaac Lidsky is extremely accomplished and has developed a philosophy that includes all sorts of concepts such as being present in the moment, doing what works and not abdicating responsibility for your life to your personal heroes and villains. His half an hour Google Talk may make some people rethink their attitudes towards their sight losses.

While I don’t expect many people to feel ‘lucky’ they are going blind – and Lidsky does consider his blindness to have been a blessing – Lidsky’s perspective on things can be thought provoking.

OK, onward to ‘lamp stuff’. We have quoted Joshua Dunaief before. One of the most helpful things he does for me in the current article is give us a pronunciation guide for lampalizumab. It is lamp-uh-liz-you-mab. Sort of like “Lamp!…uh, Liz, you mad/b?” You know, what you say when you knock over Elizabeth’s favorite light.

We have gone over the study results already in these pages. Complement factor I variant folks got kickin’ results. The rest of us, not so much. A reason for genetic testing for us before we submit to needles in the eyes, literally!

Dunaief says results are expected in 2018. Yep, December is their target date for publication. He does not mention phase 3 is over this December as is indicated in clinicaltrials.gov.

So, basically, still not really sure what is happening with ‘lamp stuff’ and me. May be offered it in December. May not be. May accept the offer. May not. I would love to know my genotype as compared to the SNPs they found in the experimental sample. Being a responder would be incredible. Being a nonresponder would be very bad. Dilemma.

And information for our ‘wet’ friends for my last 200 words. In JAMA Ophthalmology Jackson, Boyer and Brown reported the results of an experiment with an ORALLY administered vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) inhibitor. In other words, they have been experimenting with a pill they hope would do the same thing as your anti-VEGF shots.

The stuff is a tyrosine kinase inhibitor. It caused a lot of upset tummies and diarrhea (5 and 6 subjects out of 35 respectively) but the side effects were not bad enough to stop the experiment. Some people did stop because of liver problems. Those with liver issues would probably not be candidates for the treatment.

Only 40% of the total required rescue shots. Even those people received fewer injections than they had without the pills.

Before you all rush out for your X-82 pills, bear in mind this was a phase 1 experiment. That is safety and tolerability, guys. They are moving on to proof of concept, phase 2, with a bigger n. (n being the number of subjects in the study, remember). Check clinicaltrials.gov if you are interested.

Remember we all do our part in this fight. If you have a strong liver and a strong stomach, X-82 might be your kind of research. You might get to be a lab rat before I do!

written September 2nd, 2017

Next: coming soon!

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